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David Nash Exhibition

Black Trunk, Black Butt 2010

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King and Queen

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Oculus Block, Underground Gallery Room 1

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Seventy One Steps, Oxley Bank

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Longside Gallery

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Underground Gallery Room 3

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Underground Gallery Lawn

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29.05.10 - 27.02.11
Yorkshire Sculpture Park presents a rich and extensive exhibition of work by David Nash, tracing the evolution of the artist's forty-year career and offering a vivid statement of his life's work.

 

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David Nash Exhibition

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Over 200 sculptures, installations and drawings range across the Park, including new monumental works for the Underground Gallery, a retrospective survey in Longside Gallery and contextualising displays from the artist's archive alongside sculpture in the open air and a permanent outdoor commission.

The historic landscape of the Park is a fitting backdrop chosen by Nash, the culmination of a thirty-year relationship with YSP, for this unique survey. This is the largest exhibition to date by an internationally acclaimed artist who has developed an eloquent understanding of trees, working with their traits to create sculpture, installation, projects and related drawings.

The Underground Gallery features imposing new works, including the monumental Oculus Block which the artist sourced in California. The expansive Longside Gallery comprises a survey of retrospective work from the artist's and international collections. The Bothy Gallery illustrates one of the artist's most celebrated projects, Wooden Boulder, a large piece of 200 year-old oak released into a stream in the Welsh mountains in 1978, whose journey is documented through drawing, film and photography. The Garden Gallery displays drawings, photographs and artefacts from Nash’s early career and traces the development of his practice. Seventy One Steps is a site-specific outdoor commission of 71 huge charred oak steps on the walking route along Oxley Bank, embedded in 30 tons of coal.

Nash explores the different properties of wood and trees as artistic material from early tower constructions, burnt twig charcoal drawings and growing works, most famously Ash Dome, planted in 1977. Significantly, Nash began to use the unseasoned wood of whole tree trunks and limbs after rediscovering forgotten pieces of timber that had continued to change without his intervention. This method celebrates the unique attributes of his chosen material as it continues to dry, warp and crack, changing in appearance long after the artist has finished shaping it. These works convey a wealth of expression, from enormous force to exquisite delicacy, produced by Nash's unique use of chainsaw and charring as well as natural drying.

David Nash has very generously created a number of limited editions, exclusively for this exhibition, with all proceeds going to YSP. A stunning exhibition catalogue and a range of exhibition merchandise is also available. The full range is available to buy online or onsite in the YSP Shop.

Watch BBC Four documentary David Nash: Force of Nature, looking at the life and work of the artist.

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Comments

I've been - very nice and good work
Mini on David Nash Exhibition | See all (12) comments
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I've been also, and I concur with Mini.
Anthony on David Nash Exhibition
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The park always has great sculptors and views around every corner & this new website is really good for all the latest information.
ruth stephens on David Nash Exhibition
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I really want to go
David on David Nash Exhibition
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I would like to thank YSP for all the years of enjoyment and inspiration that it has given me. :) please take a look at some of the photos i have taken of YSP over the years and especially at this photo fo the Red column . I think it is a very intresting photo of a beautiful sculpture in a intresting way .http://www.flickr.com/photos/simonking91/5284199448/ yours sinceraly simon king
Thank you on David Nash Exhibition
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We visited the exhibition at the Longside Gallery today and really enjoyed the work. The walk up there was very invigorating, the sculptures, beautiful and thought provoking. Thank you.
Sarah on David Nash Exhibition
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no admission charge...BUT £4.00 for parking, sad to say I cannot afford to go then...
Pamela on David Nash Exhibition
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My first visit to the YSP today. Had a great time in this beautiful place despite the mud and the cold. Loved Skyspace. Hopefully come back when it's not just grey!
Kay Fletcher on David Nash Exhibition
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I am so sorry that I missed David Nash. I visited family last month for 3 short days and could not make the 9 hour round trip up to the park. I do hope you keep some of his pieces there, or he has another exihibit somewhere else. Better still, he brings his sculpture over to Northern California!! Best wishes, Wendy Wendy Owen Design
Wendy Owen on David Nash Exhibition
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Please don't let the parking charge deter anyone from visiting the park. If you become a friend you can buy a parking permit and come as often as you like. On a recent visit a friend commented that the machines should be updated to take cards as well as cash. One to think about.
Carole on David Nash Exhibition
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Can you please tell me if the Nash limited edition stencil drawing red column was signed by him? This was sold by YSP during his exhibition.
Eileen Lawrence on David Nash Exhibition
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Hi Eileen – yes the print you mention was signed by David
Nina at YSP on David Nash Exhibition
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