David Nash: Residency and Fellowship Exhibition

Standing Frame, 1982. Photo Peter Sullivan Image 1 of 6
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Space for a Length, 1982. Photo Peter Sullivan Image 2 of 6
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Residency work, 1982 Image 3 of 6
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Excavated elm root, from Pyramids and Catapults, 1982. Photo Peter Sullivan Image 4 of 6
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Pyramid and mould from Pyramids and Catapults, 1981-2. Photo Peter Sullivan Image 5 of 6
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Ladder Hyphen, 1979 (made with Paul Neagu) Image 6 of 6
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01.01.81 - 01.01.82
David Nash is one of Britain’s leading sculptors and in 1981 was rapidly achieving international status with works in private and public collections in Britain, Europe, North America and Japan.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, through a residency, provided a base to Nash and a continuous point of reference for a year. Projects and ideas that started at YSP were later developed in countries including Japan and Holland, and were further extended at Bretton during the months he spent at the Park in 1981.

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Although his working methods encompass those of carpenter, woodsman/forester, sometimes excavator/archaeologist (as seen in Pyramids and Catapults) and he discovers sculptural units within nature, he is first and foremost a sculptor – exploring and creating forms in space. Trees have been his main source of inspiration and material, and he has often said they are 90% space. His most powerful work is in response to new environments; to new challenges presented by natural forces.

Direct experience is an important ingredient in all his work including the development of his sparkling and informative draughtsmanship. His drawings are often made with materials from the site where the drawings took place – earth, leaves or grass, sometimes charcoal from a fire. ‘They are not preliminary drawings for sculpture or projects but a way of relating to the source of the material and space/use for making sculpture.’ (Welsh Arts Council)

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