Dennis Oppenheim: Alternative Landscape Components

Trees: From Alternative Landscape Components, 2006 Image 1 of 5
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Trees: From Alternative Landscape Components, 2006 Image 2 of 5
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Tree Curved Branches & Trunks, 2006
Courtesy Amy Oppenheim
Image 3 of 5
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Tree with Curved Branches & Limbs, 2006
Courtesy Amy Oppenheim
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1 Dome Dog H. 3 Dog Houses 2 Chairs 3 Fences. 1 Door, 2006
Courtesy Amy Oppenheim
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21.11.13 - 16.02.14
YSP Centre & open air
In autumn 2013 YSP re-presented Trees: From Alternative Landscape Components (2006) by the American artist Dennis Oppenheim (1938-2011), an installation that investigates relationships between natural and artificial environments. Formed of fluorescent trees, fake hedgerows, seemingly genetically modified flowers, the Trees have branches laden with a range of curious domestic artifacts including baths, toilets, sinks, dog kennels, dustbins, plastic chairs and parts of fences.

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Oppenheim produced over 100 sketches of proposals for his alternative landscapes, and a parallel exhibition of these drawings was selected by Lisa Le Feuvre (Head of Sculpture Studies, Henry Moore Institute), in collaboration with the Oppenheim Estate.

Alongside these drawings was the first public showing of a 2006 interview between Oppenheim and Willoughby Sharp (1936–2008), who describe Alternative Landscape Components as ‘a proposal for a giant installation taking the place of nature’. Sharp was an artist, curator, teacher and writer whose many achievements include the magazine Avalanche, edited with Liza Bear, in whose pages Oppenheim was a regular feature.

The project coincided with Dennis Oppenheim: Thought Collision Factories at the Henry Moore Institute.

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The re-siting of the sculptures in the lower park with a real forest as backdrop allows the work to be experienced from an enhanced perspective and encourages reflection from a comparative and contrasting dimension.
Stephen Ripley on Dennis Oppenheim: Alternative Landscape Components

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