Michael Zwingmann

Invasion, 1999 Image 1 of 4
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Invasion, 1999 Image 2 of 4
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Invasion, 1999 Image 3 of 4
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Invasion, 1999 Image 4 of 4
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01.01.08 - 27.05.15
Michael Zwingmann, born in Hanover in 1964, is concerned with making sculptures that interact with their environments.

Invasion consists of five cylindrical forms sited on a former football field, which from a distance resemble giant black hay bales. Closer inspection, however, reveals the solidity and potential menace of the material and the work demonstrates a collision between the man-made and natural worlds.

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Invasion consists of five, massive cylindrical asphalt forms, each 1.83 metres in height and weighing almost five tonnes. The work is made by pouring liquid asphalt into large steel formers, which hardens as it cools.

The use of this severe construction material relates to the subtitle of the sculpture: The Noise of the Road Penetrates into the Park. Dr Uwe Rüth of the Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl in Germany wrote in 1999 that the subtitle may refer to The Noise of the Street Enters the House, an Umberto Boccioni painting created in 1911.

Boccioni was part of the Futurist movement, which originated in Italy in the early 20th century and celebrated technological advances, believing machines such as cars and planes to be man-made triumphs over nature.

In referencing the Futurist’s optimistic view of the technological age, Zwingmann could be proposing that what was once seen to be an achievement over nature has come to be considered an assault; the title, material and presence of the piece suggesting an invasion of the natural landscape.

This work is kindly loaned by the artist and Galerie Scheffel, Germany

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On a recent visit to the park and seeing this sculpture I noticed that the description is apparently incorrect as far as material used to cast the pieces. It says that asphalt was used, but upon closer inspection I feel quite certain that the cylinders are made of concrete that is painted black. It seems obvious that asphalt could not possibly hold this form for any duration long enough to be installed this way.
Paul Hilliard on Michael Zwingmann | See all (3) comments
Hi Paul. The technical notes we have on the work, and which are supplied by the artist himself, describe how asphalt is heated to a very high temperature in order to make it liquid, before being cast in large formers. We’re quite sure it is in fact made from asphalt. Nina at YSP on Michael Zwingmann
Hi Paul. The technical notes we have on the work and which are supplied by the artist himself, describe how asphalt is heated to a very high temperature in order to make it liquid, before being cast in large formers. We’re quite sure it is in fact made from asphalt. Nina at YSP on Michael Zwingmann

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